Ano 2005 - Volume 25, Número 1


Título
Polioencefalomalacia em caprinos e ovinos na região semi-árida do Nordeste do Brasil, p.9-14
Autores

Resumo
Lima E.F., Riet-Correa F., Tabosa I.M., Dantas A.F.M., Medeiros J.M. & Sucupira Júnior G. 2005. [Polioencephalomalacia in goats and sheep in the semiarid region of northeastern Brazil.] Polioencefalomalacia em caprinos e ovinos na região semi-árida do Nordeste do Brasil. Pesquisa Veterinária Brasileira 25(1):9-14. Centro de Saúde e Tecnologia Rural, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Campus de Patos, 58700-000 Patos, PB, Brazil. E-mail: riet@cstr.ufcg.edu.br

Seven outbreaks of polioencephalomalacia in goats and 3 in sheep are reported from the semiarid region of northeastern Brazil. Animals of different ages were affected in various seasons of the year. In 5 outbreaks the animals were supplemented with concentrate ration and in 5 others they were only grazing on pastures. In one outbreak sheep were supplemented with an energy-protein-mineral mixture containing 1.3% of sulfur flower. Clinical signs were characterized by blindness, depression, head pressing, circling, grinding of the teeth, incoordination, spastic paralysis, ataxia, depression of the palpebral and pupillary reflexes, lateral strabismus, nystagmus, and dilated pupils. Nine affected animals were treated with thiamine and dexamethasone; 7 of them recovered but 2 died. The diagnosis of the disease was based on the recovered animals after treatment and/or on the histologic lesions. The clinical course varied from 2 to 15 days. On three animals post-mortem examination was made. One had herniation of the cerebellum through the Foramen magnum and softening of the cerebral cortex. The cut surface of the cerebral cortex showed cavitation and yellowish discoloration. Another animal had only cerebellar herniation. In a third animal no gross lesions were observed. Histological changes in the 3 animals were laminar necrosis of the cerebral cortex, and in 2 malacia of the thalamus and the rostral colliculi was also observed. In 9 outbreaks the cause of the disease was not determined, but one was probably due to sulfur toxicosis caused by the high sulfur content of the energy-protein-mineral mixture containing 1.3% of sulfur flower (96% sulfur) and 30% chicken litter (0.39% sulfur).
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