Resultado da pesquisa (2)

Termo utilizado na pesquisa Dirofilaria immitis

#1 - Dirofilaria immitis infection in dogs in Algodoal Island, Brazilian Amazon

Abstract in English:

Dirofilaria immitis, a parasite that mainly infects domestic or wild canids, but can infect felines or humans as well, is frequent in many Brazilian areas. The main objective of this research was to determine the prevalence of natural canine infection at the Algodoal‑Maiandeua Island complex, in the coastal region of the state of Pará, Brazil. A total of 67 dogs were sampled for blood microfilariae detection and for D. immitis DNA detection. Microfilaria and D. immitis DNA could be detected in 35.8% (24/67) of the animals. In one dog’s sample no microfilariae were detected, but the PCR was positive, suggesting that either larvae recently were eliminated or adults died shortly before sample collecting. Therefore, it can be concluded that the occurrence of D. immitis is a health threat for domestic and wild canids at the Island of Algodoal, as well as for feline or human health.

Abstract in Portuguese:

Dirofilaria immitis, um parasito que infecta principalmente canídeos domésticos ou selvagens, embora também possa infectar felinos e humanos, é frequente em muitas áreas do Brasil. O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar a ocorrência da infecção natural em cães provenientes do complexo da Ilha de Algodoal-Maiandeua, região litorânea do estado do Pará, Brasil. Um total de 67 cães tiveram o sangue coletado para detecção de microfilárias de D. immitis e seu DNA. Microfilárias e o DNA de D. immitis foram detectados em 35,8% (24/67) dos animais. Na amostra de um animal, não foram observadas microfilárias, mas o seu DNA foi detectado, sugerindo que as larvas tenham sido recentemente eliminadas ou os adultos tenham morrido antes da coleta da amostra. Portanto, pode-se concluir que a ocorrência de D. immitis é uma ameaça à saúde de canídeos domésticos no complexo da Ilha de Algodoal-Maiandeua, bem como para felinos e seres humanos.


#2 - Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) disease in a Brazilian oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus), p.474-478

Abstract in English:

ABSTRACT.- Filoni C., Pena H.F.J., Gennari S.M., Cristo D.S., Torres L.N. & Catão-Dias J.L. 2009. Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) disease in a Brazilian oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus). Pesquisa Veterinária Brasileira 29(6):373-478. Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Dr. Orlando Marques de Paiva 87, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP 05508-270, Brazil. E-mail: claudiafiloni@triade.org.br Heartworm disease is caused by the intravascular nematode Dirofilaria immitis, a pathogen of public health importance usually associated to domestic dogs and cats, and to a lesser extend to other mammal species. The oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus) is a threatened neotropic felid species that naturally occurs in Brazil. Here, we report the encounter of adult and larval stages of heartworms in a female specimen of L. tigrinus, probable of free-ranging origin, from Ubatuba, São Paulo, Brazil, which died showing clinical signals compatible with heartworm disease. This was the first reported case of D. immitis infection and associated disease in L. tigrinus, also suggesting that the oncilla acted as a definitive host for this parasite. The present findings confirmed D. immitis as a pathogenic agent for this felid species, thus supporting the recommendation for the inclusion of diagnostic testing for this pathogen in routine health screening procedures for captive and free-ranging oncillas in Brazil, especially in those localities where climate conditions support the occurrence of the parasite. Potential reservoirs as oncillas are established beyond the reach of veterinary care, thus representing a continuing risk for domestic animals and humans acquiring heartworm infection. We encourage further serologic and molecular studies aiming to establish D. immitis prevalences in L. tigrinus and other wild carnivores in the region of Ubatuba, as well as ecological and veterinary studies to access the role of this pathogen for the survival of this threatened felid species.

Abstract in Portuguese:

ABSTRACT.- Filoni C., Pena H.F.J., Gennari S.M., Cristo D.S., Torres L.N. & Catão-Dias J.L. 2009. Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) disease in a Brazilian oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus). Pesquisa Veterinária Brasileira 29(6):373-478. Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Dr. Orlando Marques de Paiva 87, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP 05508-270, Brazil. E-mail: claudiafiloni@triade.org.br Heartworm disease is caused by the intravascular nematode Dirofilaria immitis, a pathogen of public health importance usually associated to domestic dogs and cats, and to a lesser extend to other mammal species. The oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus) is a threatened neotropic felid species that naturally occurs in Brazil. Here, we report the encounter of adult and larval stages of heartworms in a female specimen of L. tigrinus, probable of free-ranging origin, from Ubatuba, São Paulo, Brazil, which died showing clinical signals compatible with heartworm disease. This was the first reported case of D. immitis infection and associated disease in L. tigrinus, also suggesting that the oncilla acted as a definitive host for this parasite. The present findings confirmed D. immitis as a pathogenic agent for this felid species, thus supporting the recommendation for the inclusion of diagnostic testing for this pathogen in routine health screening procedures for captive and free-ranging oncillas in Brazil, especially in those localities where climate conditions support the occurrence of the parasite. Potential reservoirs as oncillas are established beyond the reach of veterinary care, thus representing a continuing risk for domestic animals and humans acquiring heartworm infection. We encourage further serologic and molecular studies aiming to establish D. immitis prevalences in L. tigrinus and other wild carnivores in the region of Ubatuba, as well as ecological and veterinary studies to access the role of this pathogen for the survival of this threatened felid species.


Colégio Brasileiro de Patologia Animal SciELO Brasil CAPES CNPQ UNB UFRRJ CFMV